Into The World Of Aikido Martial Arts

With the visible convergence of East and West cultures, more and more people are discovering and rediscovering new means self-discipline especially in the field of martial arts. One of these means is called "Aikido," a very popular Japanese martial art.

KNOWING AIKIDO

“Do not fight force with force,” this is the most basic principle of Aikido. Considered as one of the non-aggressive styles in martial arts, Aikido has become popular because it doesn’t instigate or provoke any attack. Instead, the force of the attacker is redirected into throws, locks, and several restraining techniques.
Since aikido uses very few punches and kicks, the size, weight, age, and physical strength of the participants or the opponents only partake only a small role. What's important is the skilled Aikido practitioner is skilled enough to redirect his or her attacker's energy while keeping him or her in a constant of unbalance.

The history of Aikido as a martial art can be traced when Morihei Ueshiba discovered and developed its principle of aikido. Known as "O Sensei" or the "Great Teacher," Ueshiba made sure to develop a martial art that is based on a purely physical level using movements like throws, joint locks and techniques derived from another martial arts like "Jujitsu" and "Kenjutsu."

Technically, aikido was stemmed out and developed mainly from "daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu" while incorporating several training movements similar to the "yari" or "spear, "jo" or a short "quarterstaff" and from "juken" or "bayonet". Although these jujitsu movements are prominent while practicing the martial art, many practitioners agree that strongest influences of aikido is that of kenjutsu.

When he finally developed the minor and major principles of Aikido, Ueshiba emphasized that the martial art does not only pertain to self-defense techniques but can also play a major role in the enhancement of the practitioner's moral and spiritual aspects eventually leading them to place greater weight on the development and achievement of peace and harmony. In fact, because of the great emphasis in the development of harmony and peace, seasoned aikido practitioners say that "the way of harmony of the spirit" is one phrase that could describe or translate the term "aikido" in English.

Just like any other martial art, aikido has various techniques that include ikkyo or the "first technique," "nikyo" or the "second technique," "sankyo," or the "third technique," "yonkyo" or the "fourth technique," the "gokyo" or the "fifth technique," the "shihonage" or the "four-direction throw," the "kotegaeshi" or the wrist return, "kokyunage" or the "breath throw," "iriminage" or the entering-body throw, "tenchinage" or the "heaven-and-earth throw," "koshinage," or the "hip throw," "jujinage" or the "shaped-like-'ten'-throw," and the "kaitennage" or the rotation throw."

Although aikido is not about punching or kicking the opponent, it is not considered as a static art. It is still a very effective means of martial arts because it requires the aikido practitioner to use the energy of their opponent so they can gain control over them. When you will look at the martial art closely, you will realize that aikido is not only a means of self-defense technique but can also serve a means of spiritual enlightenment, physical health or exercise or a simple means of attaining peace of mind, concentration, and serenity.

Although different aikido styles gives great emphasis on the spiritual aspects to varying levels—some to greater or lesser degrees—the idea that the martial arts was conceptualized in order to achieve peace and harmony remains the most basic ideology of the martial art.

 

 
Translate Page To German Tranlate Page To Spanish Translate Page To French Translate Page To Italian Translate Page To Japanese Translate Page To Korean Translate Page To Portuguese Translate Page To Chinese

More Articles

 

 

Search This Site

 

Related Products And FREE Videos


 

More Articles


Defending Oneself Using Nothing But Aikido Tomiki

... basics and then practice regularly to develop better skills. The individual may not get it right the first time or fall more often than others but everyone had to undergo the same thing in order to become a better fighter. When the person is ready, it wouldn t hurt to participate in Tomiki Aikido, which ... 

Read Full Article  


Aikido Secrets Everyone Should Know

... aikido is being consistent with the technique. The arms will surely feel heavy after some time or a certain amount of energy is drained after a few moves. By being able to do the same thing despite these difficulties, anyone can truly be called a true martial artist. People who want to check on how well ... 

Read Full Article  


Using Aikido In Combat

... person doesn t strike the opponent with the intent to injure or kill. The objective is merely to subdue the opponent with minimum force to be able to get to safety. There are various Dojos all across the country that teach aikido. The person can sign up in one and then move up the ranks. Beginners will ... 

Read Full Article  


Knowing The Basics Of Aikido

... fact, is often perceived as a form of exercise or a dance because of some of its forms. It is also viewed by some quarters as some form of martial mesmerism. Aikido is even confused with Daito Ryu Aikijutsu, it is different in its essence. Still, its founder attributed his creation of aikido to the way, ... 

Read Full Article  


The Relaxed Martial Art

... the fact that a martial art which was in all intentions created for combat and winning over the enemy can indeed to be claim to the art of peace. For all intents and purposes however, the philosophical and spiritual foundation of Aikido is about maintaining a constant state of relaxation. It is in this ... 

Read Full Article